Hemp Oil Extract: A New Option for Pets in Pain

Hemp Oil Extract: A New Option for Pets in Pain

Hemp Oil Extarct has been receiving increasing attention for its use in the treatment of pain in veterinary medicine. Unlike marijuana, which is a class 1 substance that contains varying levels of its active ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the Cannabidiol in hemp oil extract is an extract of the plant that has THC levels lower than 0.3 percent.

KEEPING THE BODY BALANCE

Hemp Oil Extract affects the endocannabinoid receptors, which are located in both the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. Endocannabinoid receptors are very important as they function to maintain body homeostasis.

Hemp Oil Extract is deeply involved in the neural transmissions needed to maintain homeostasis.

The “magic” of treatments that both upregulate and downregulate neural transmissions is that they always act to move the body toward a normal state and therefore don’t shift things in the wrong direction. 

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HEMP OIL EXTRACT AND A PHARMACEUTICAL?

Hemp oil extract works quite unlike many pharmaceuticals. Most pharmaceuticals only stimulate upregulation or downregulation, making it possible to move body systems out of their normal or homeostatic state. Because hemp oil extract works toward homeostasis, it doesn’t do this, making unwanted side effects rare and giving hemp oil extract a good safety profile.

There is almost no published research on the use of hemp oil in animals. Some research is being performed at Colorado State University on the use of hemp oil for pain currently, but as with most research projects, the results won’t be available for some time. Therefore, practitioners who want to recommend or dispense hemp extract must do so based on information from anecdotal evidence—one of the worst types of evidence to rely on.

I have encouraged many of my clients to use hemp oil to treat the pain of degenerative joint disease and other chronic conditions in their pets. The results have been mixed—but that’s true of proven treatments such as Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) therapy as well. 

Excerpts for this article by By: Dr. Micheal Petty is a faculty member of the Canine Rehabilitation Institute in Wellington, Florida, and owner of Arbor Pointe Veterinary Hospital in Canton, Michigan.

 

 

 


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